A new kind of quantum bits in two dimensions

ScienceDaily | 3/19/2018 | Staff
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The theoretical simulations for the new technology were performed in the team of Prof. Florian Libisch and Prof. Joachim Burgdörfer at TU Wien. The experiment involved the group of Prof. Markus Morgenstern at RWTH Aachen and the team around Nobel-prize laureates Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov from Manchester who prepared the samples. The results have now been published in Nature Nanotechnology.

"For many applications in the field of quantum technologies one requires a quantum system were electrons occupy two states -- similar to a classical switch -- on or off, with the difference that quantum physics also allows for arbitrary superpositions of the on and off states" explains Florian Libisch from the Institute for Theoretical Physics at TU Wien.

Property - Systems - Energy - Difference - States

A key property of such systems is the energy difference between those two quantum states: "Efficiently manipulating the information stored in the quantum state of the electrons requires perfect control of the system parameters. An ideal system allows for continuous tuning the energy difference from zero to a large value" says Libisch.

For systems found in nature -- for example atoms -- this is usually difficult to realize. The energies of atomic states, and hence their differences, are fixed. Tuning energies becomes possible in synthetic nanostructures engineered towards confining electrons. Such structures are often referred to as quantum dots or "artificial atoms."

Research - Team - TU - Wien - RWTH

The international research team of TU Wien, RWTH Aachen and the University of Manchester now succeeded in developing a new type of quantum dots which allow for much more accurately and widely tunable energy levels of confined electrons than before. This progress was made possible by combining two very special materials: graphene, a conductive single atomic layer of carbon atoms, and hexagonal boron nitride, also a single layer of material...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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