Is it possible to die from eating too much chocolate? Asking for a friend.

Popular Science | 2/14/2018 | Staff
penaert (Posted by) Level 3
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The punishment is torturous to watch, and the act is probably illegal. But if this were real life, would Bruce have died? No, he would not have suffered any sort of chocolate toxicity from it. A conservative estimate would have him eating probably only about a pound of pure chocolate. That’s not enough to kill somebody.

In the fact that it is almost impossible for the average human to die by chocolate consumption.

Dose - Chocolate - Reed - Caldwell - Emergency

“There certainly is a toxic dose of chocolate, and it can be fatal,” says Reed Caldwell, an emergency medicine physician at New York University Langone Medical Center. However, if attempted, he says, you are far more likely to wind up in the emergency room with a severely upset stomach (likely with vomiting) than with chocolate poisoning.

Why are we having this conversation at all? Is there something that makes chocolate toxic? The cocoa bean, from which chocolate is made, contains a substance called theobromine, which is a plant alkaloid with a slightly bitter taste (other plant alkaloids include America’s favorite, caffeine, as well as cocaine, nicotine, and the effective chemotherapy drug Vincristine). In the human body, theobromine is, at most, a mild stimulant, acting similar to caffeine. Theobromine is also a vasodilator, meaning it can open up your blood vessels and cause your blood pressure to drop. It’s also a diuretic, so you could feel the urge to urinate more often.

National - Institutes - Health - Toxicology - Data

Additionally, according the National Institutes of Health’s toxicology data network, theobromine also crosses the blood-brain barrier, that semi-permeable layer of blood capillaries that allow only certain substances into the brain. This suggests that it might share caffeine’s beneficial effects...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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