Particulate filter research may enable more fuel-efficient vehicles

phys.org | 2/14/2018 | Staff
megzmegz123 (Posted by) Level 3
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Researchers are looking to neutrons for new ways to save fuel during the operation of filters that clean the soot, or carbon and ash-based particulate matter, emitted by vehicles.

A team of researchers from the Energy and Transportation Science Division at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is studying soot and ash collection and removal in particulate filters with neutron imaging, a technique sensitive enough to detect fine layers of material. Using the Neutron Imaging Facility instrument, beamline CG-1D, at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), they are investigating the structure of particulate layers generated by a series of gasoline fuels.

US - Emissions - Regulations - Particulate - Filters

Since 2007, U.S. emissions regulations have required particulate filters to control soot from diesel vehicles. Now, researchers are investigating how to use these filters for gasoline direct-injection engines, which release particles even smaller than those produced by diesel-powered engines. The ORNL team set out to decipher the differences between the ways diesel and gasoline particulates interact with the filters and learn how best to manage filter operation in both categories.

"The purpose of our research is enabling more fuel-efficient vehicles, whether that's understanding how the soot regenerates in diesel vehicles to improve fuel economy, or evaluating how a future gasoline filter would...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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