An executive recruiter explains how to prepare for a second-round interview

Business Insider | 2/12/2018 | Rochelle Kaplan, Monster
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The second interview is the time to shine or fizzle.

The best way to make a great second impression is to have a solid plan and lots of success stories at the ready.

Questions - Lot - Interest

Be prepared to answer tricky questions, and come prepared with a lot of your own to show your interest.

You’re feeling great after your first interview for a job with a prospective employer and you’re told to expect a call back from human resources about setting up a second interview. When you do get that call, your initial feelings are excitement and triumph! Then, just as quickly, those feelings are replaced by anxiety and fear when you realize that this interview will be a defining moment for you. This will be your opportunity to shine or fizzle—to stand out or fall flat on your face.

Moment - Being - Interview - Assessment - Situation

Before you panic, relax and relish the moment. Being asked back for a second interview confirms your initial assessment of the situation: The employer is sincerely interested in hiring you.

So once you’ve calmed down, how do you prepare for this significant, sought-after second interview? What can you expect in the way of questions from hiring managers, and how much information should you offer during the interview?

Purpose - Interview - Achievements - Knowledge - Projects

"The purpose of the second interview is to show your best, to sell your achievements and knowledge, and to elaborate on projects you worked on in the past," says Gerard Clement, director of professional services for a Boston-area software firm.

"When you interview, you have to jump in and go for it. You need to give (us) enough confidence in your abilities and skills to move forward with an offer." Oh, and don’t let the interviewer do all the talking, adds Clement, who sees this as a "red flag." And be prepared for everything, even the type of chair you might encounter!

While...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Business Insider
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