Liquid crystal molecules form nano rings

phys.org | 2/7/2018 | Staff
max1max1 (Posted by) Level 4
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2018/liquidcrysta.jpg

At DESY's X-ray source PETRA III, scientists have investigated an intriguing form of self-assembly in liquid crystals: When the liquid crystals are filled into cylindrical nanopores and heated, their molecules form ordered rings as they cool—a condition that otherwise does not occur naturally in the material. This behavior enables nanomaterials with new optical and electrical properties, as the team led by Patrick Huber from Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) reports in the journal Physical Review Letters.

The scientists studied a special form of liquid crystals composed of disc-shaped molecules called discotic liquid crystals. In these materials, the disk molecules can form high, electrically conductive pillars by themselves, stacking up like coins. The researchers filled discotic liquid crystals in nanopores in a silicate glass. The cylindrical pores had a diameter of only 17 nanometers (millionths of a millimeter) and a depth of 0.36 millimeters.

Liquid - Crystals - Degrees - Celsius - Disk

There, the liquid crystals were heated to around 100 degrees Celsius and cooled slowly. The initially disorganised disk molecules formed concentric rings arranged like round curved columns. Starting from the edge of the pore, one ring after the other gradually formed with decreasing temperature until at about 70 degrees Celsius the entire cross section of the pore was filled with concentric rings. Upon reheating, the rings gradually disappeared again.

"This change of the molecular structure in confined liquid crystals can be monitored with X-ray diffraction methods as a function of temperature and with high accuracy," says co-author and DESY scientist Milena Lippmann, who prepared and participated in the experiments at the High-Resolution Diffraction Beamline P08 at PETRA III. "The combination of symmetry and confinement gives rise to unexpected, new phase transitions," says...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Goverment, no matter how big, is always a big problem.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!