Novel PET tracer clearly identifies and tracks bacterial infection in lungs

ScienceDaily | 1/8/2018 | Staff
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"Currently, bacterial infections can be diagnosed only after they have become systemic or have caused significant anatomical tissue damage, a stage at which they are challenging to treat owing to the high bacterial burden," explains Chin K. Ng, PhD, at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky.

He points out, "18F-FDG PET, a widely commercially available imaging agent, is capable of imaging infection, but it cannot distinguish infections from other pathologies such as cancer and inflammation. Therefore, there is a great need to develop imaging agents with high specificity and sensitivity. There are still no specific imaging agents that can differentiate bacterial infection from sterile inflammation at an early stage."

Study - Mice - Klebsiella - Pneumoniae - Bacteria

For this study, mice were inoculated with either live Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria to induce lung infection, or the dead form of the bacteria to induce inflammation. Half of the mice with the live bacteria were imaged with PET/CT using either 18F-FDS or 18F-FDG on days 0, 1, 2 and 3 to monitor disease progression post infection. The other half were screened by bioluminescent imaging, and mice with visible infection were selected for follow-up PET/CT scans with 18F-FDS. For the inflammation group, half the mice were imaged with PET/CT using 18F-FDS and half using 18F-FDG from day 1 to day 4 post-inoculation.

While both 18F-FDS and 18F-FDG effectively tracked the degree of bacterial infection measured by bioluminescent optical imaging, only 18F-FDS was able to differentiate...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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