Earth's newest iceberg up close: NASA reveals incredible new images of trillion ton A-68 which is the size of DELAWARE

Mail Online | 10/31/2017 | Mark Prigg For Dailymail.com
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In early July, a huge crack in Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf caused a trillion ton iceberg - the third biggest ever recorded - to break off from the icy southern continent.

The huge chunk of ice, dubbed iceberg A-68, measures 5,800 square kilometres (2,240 square miles), making it around the size of Delaware, or four times the area covered by Greater London.

NASA - 'megaberg - Time - Scientists

Now, NASA has been able to fly over the new 'megaberg' to see it up close for the first time - and scientists admit they were stunned by just how big it is.

'I was aware that I would be seeing an iceberg the size of Delaware, but I wasn't prepared for how that would look from the air,' said NASA's Kathryn Hansen, one of the scientists on the flight.

Icebergs - Part - Berg - Surface

'Most icebergs I have seen appear relatively small and blocky, and the entire part of the berg that rises above the ocean surface is visible at once.

'Not this berg.

Part - Ice - Shelf

'A-68 is so expansive it appears if it were still part of the ice shelf.

'But if you look far into the distance you can see a thin line of water between the iceberg and where the new front of the shelf begins.'

NASA - Flight - Part - IceBridge - Program

NASA hopes the flight, part of its IceBridge program, will help researchers understand the bedrock under the ice.

'This particular flight, however, aimed to get more than just a superficial look at Larsen C; to understand the system as a whole, scientists also want to know the bathymetry of the bedrock below,' NASA said.

Flight - Path - Gravity - Measurements - Mind

To do that, the flight path was planned with gravity measurements in mind.

While radar instruments can 'see' through snow and ice on land to map the bedrock, radar has trouble when instead of land there is water below the ice.

Gravimeter

For the gravimeter, that's not a...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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