Discovery lights path for Alzheimer's research

ScienceDaily | 10/25/2017 | Staff
DanRules394 (Posted by) Level 3
The study done on long amyloid fibrils backs up computer simulations by colleagues at the University of Miami that predicted the photoluminescent metal complex would attach itself to the amyloid peptide near a hydrophobic (water-avoiding) cleft that appears on the surface of the fibril aggregate. That cleft presents a new target for drugs.

Finding the site was relatively simple once the lab of Rice Chemist Angel Martí used its rhenium-based complexes to target fibrils. The light-switching complex glows when hit with ultraviolet light, but when it binds to the fibril it becomes more than 100 times brighter and causes oxidation of the amyloid peptide.

Beach - Marti - Someone - Footprints - Sand

"It's like walking on the beach," Marti said. "You can see that someone was there before you by looking at footprints in the sand. While we cannot see the rhenium complex, we can find the oxidation (footprint) it produces on the amyloid peptide.

"That oxidation only happens right next to the place where it binds," he said. "The real importance of this research is that allows us to see with a high degree of certainty where molecules can interact with amyloid beta fibrils."

Binding - Sites - Rhenium - Complex - Fibrils

"The binding sites of the rhenium complex on fibrils were not known experimentally. That's where our computational techniques became invaluable," said University of Miami Chemist Rajeev Prabhakar. "Our computer modeling predicted binding sites and the modes of interactions of these molecules at the atomic level."

The study appears in the journal Chem.

Cleft - Binding - Site - Amyloid - Beta

"We believe this hydrophobic cleft is a general binding site (on amyloid beta) for molecules," Martí said. "This is important because amyloid beta aggregation has been associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We know that fibrillar insoluble amyloid beta is toxic to cell cultures. Soluble amyloid oligomers that are made of several misfolded units of amyloid beta are also toxic to cells, probably even more than...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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