California fires kill 31, deadliest in state's history

phys.org | 10/13/2017 | Staff
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The death toll from raging California wildfires rose to 31 Thursday as body recovery teams used cadaver dogs to locate victims, making it the deadliest series of blazes in the state's history.

The fires, which began on Sunday, have swept through California's wine country, leaving thousands of people homeless and burning over 190,000 acres (76,000 hectares) of land.

Gusty - Winds - Thursday - Efforts - Firefighters

Gusty winds on Thursday were hampering the efforts of the 8,000 firefighters battling 20 blazes, and weather conditions were not forecast to improve.

"What this means is that our fires will continue to burn erratically," California fire chief Ken Pimlott told a news conference. "They have the potential to shift in any direction at any time.

Way - Catastrophe

"We are a long way from being done with this catastrophe," he said.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) announced Thursday that the fires have claimed 31 lives, while Sheriff Rob Giordano of hard-hit Sonoma County said his department has received around 1,100 reports of missing persons.

Giordano - Figure - Reports

Of those, "745 of them, roughly, have been located safe," while "we still have 400 outstanding," Giordano said, noting that the actual figure may be smaller because there are sometimes duplicate reports.

He said targeted body recovery efforts had begun in cases where all other leads were exhausted.

Recovery - Phase - Dogs - Bodies

"We're moving into a recovery phase," he said. "We have cadaver dogs up here that can basically scent bodies and help us find people."

Giordano warned that it was "going to be a slow process" as fires continue to burn, and that identifying victims would be difficult.

Remains - Things - Ashes - Bones - Identification

"Some of these remains are actually intact bodies—much easier to identify, much easier to get things from. Some of them are merely ashes and bones, and we may never get truly confirmative identification on ashes," he said.

In cases in which bodies have been badly burned, authorities have had to use...
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