Gene identified that may provide potential therapy for cerebral cavernous malformations

ScienceDaily | 10/9/2017 | Staff
tiazanne (Posted by) Level 3
"These mouse studies reveal a critical mechanism in the pathogenesis of cerebral cavernous malformations and point to the possibility of using angiogenesis inhibitors, such as TSP1 for potential therapy," said Mark H. Ginsberg, MD, professor of medicine, UC San Diego School of Medicine.

CCMs are collections of enlarged and irregular blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS), for which there is no drug therapy. The vessels are prone to leakage causing headaches, seizures, paralysis, hearing or vision loss, or bleeding in the brain. There are two forms of the condition: familial and sporadic, affecting 1 in 200 patients in the U.S. The current treatment for CCMs involves invasive surgery, however, surgery is not possible for all patients due to location of vascular lesions within the CNS.

Cause - Malformations - Mutations - KRIT1 - Protein

The most common cause of familial cavernous malformations is mutations of KRIT1. The protein produced from this gene is found in the junctions connecting neighboring blood vessel cells. Loss of function mutations in KRIT1 result in weakened contacts between blood vessel cells and CNS vascular abnormalities as...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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