Do Sanctions Even Work? North Korea Undeterred In Its Nuclear March

The Daily Caller | 3/9/2016 | Staff
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The United Nations is preparing to vote on new sanctions, but will they slow North Korea’s tireless march toward bigger bombs and more powerful missiles?

North Korea’s pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles has been an uphill battle for years, as the international community has been sanctioning North Korea for more than a decade. North Korea tested a lackluster nuclear device for the first time in 2006, but about a week ago, the rogue regime tested a possible staged thermonuclear bomb for deployment atop the North’s Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).

Wake - North - Korea - ICBM - Test

In the wake of North Korea’s second ICBM test in late July, the U.N. approved the “strongest sanctions ever” on the country. Since sanctions went into effect, North Korean markets have remained stable. It is, however, difficult to know what effect sanctions will have in the long run.

“As the sanctions regime expands, so does the scope of evasion,” a U.N. panel of experts concluded recently, “Lax enforcement of the sanctions regime coupled with the [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s] evolving evasion techniques [is] undermining the goals of the resolutions that the DPRK abandon all [weapons of mass destruction].”

Andrea - Berger - Fellow - Royal - United

Andrea Berger, an associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute, called the North Korean sanctions regime a “house without foundations,” claiming that “not a single component of the U.N. sanctions regime against North Korea currently enjoys robust international implementation.”

As to whether economic sanctions can effectively prevent North Korea from advancing its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs, answers vary greatly.

Grass - Program - President - Vladimir - Putin

“They’d rather eat grass than give up their nuclear program,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said recently.

North Korea has experienced famine and mass starvation before, and North Korean officials appear indifferent to sanctions, even if the state media outlets issue threats in response to possible sanctions.

Devastation

“We’ve been through [devastation] twice before — the Korean...
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