How reading and writing with your child boost more than just literacy

ScienceDaily | 8/31/2017 | Staff
n.king (Posted by) Level 3
And while home literacy activities have already been associated with higher test scores, the new study shows these activities also provide students with tools for lifetime success.

"People who are good students tend to become good employees by being on time and putting forward their best work. All of the things that make you a good student also make you a good employee," said Nicole Alston-Abel, a Federal Way Public Schools psychologist who conducted the study while pursuing her doctorate at the UW. "If you make sure your child is academically engaged at home through third grade, kids go on autopilot -- they know how to 'do' school after that."

Alston-Abel - Data - Co-author - Virginia - Berninger

Alston-Abel analyzed data collected by co-author Virginia Berninger, UW emeritus professor of education, who conducted a five-year longitudinal study of academic performance in grades one through seven. As part of that study, Berninger sent home questionnaires asking parents if, and how, they helped their children with reading and writing; Alston-Abel, a former primary teacher, then compared the responses with students' academic performance.

The study published online in May in the Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation.

Range - Ages - School - Experiences - Study

To collect a range of ages and school experiences, the study followed two groups of students in public elementary schools near the UW campus -- one cohort of students from first to fifth grade, the other from third to seventh grade. In all, 241 families participated over five years, completing annual questionnaires about how their child felt about reading and writing, what kinds of activities they engaged in at home, and what kind of help parents provided.

The demographics of both cohorts reflected neighborhoods around the university: About 85 percent of students were white or Asian American, and nearly three-fourths of parents had a bachelor's or advanced degree. A more diverse pool, Alston-Abel said, would be illuminating from a...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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