Scientists unearth cell 'checkpoint' that stops allergic diseases

ScienceDaily | 8/9/2017 | Staff
JimmyJoe (Posted by) Level 3
The discovery now provides a potential new target for drug developers to home in on. In theory, a drug that successfully regulates this newly pinpointed 'checkpoint' would better control overly aggressive allergic responses.

The team of scientists was led by Science Foundation Ireland Stokes Professor of Translational Immunology, Padraic Fallon, of the School of Medicine in the Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute. The work has just been published in the leading peer-reviewed medical journal The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Conditions - Asthma - Eczema - Arise - Immune

Allergic conditions, such as asthma or eczema, arise when the immune system misfires and sparks an uncontrolled response to common allergens, such as house dust mites. In asthma this aberrant immune response leads to immune cells infiltrating the lungs, where they cause inflammation that affects lung function and leads to difficulties in breathing.

One key cell that is an early initiator of this allergic inflammation is known as a 'type 2 innate lymphoid cell' (ILC2). These cells instruct others, known as 'Th2 cells', to drive the cascade of inflammation in the lungs that leads to the development of asthma.

Study - Mouse - Approach

In this study, using a mouse transgenic approach,...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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