Boeing’s New Plane Engine Is as Wide as a Fuselage

WIRED | 5/19/2017 | Matt Jancer
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WHOEVER SAID SIZE isn’t everything never had to push a giant airplane across the sky. That’s why GE’s new turbofan engine is enormous: Built using lightweight carbon fiber and 3-D printing, the GE9X is as wide as a Boeing 737 fuselage (yes, it’s a plane engine the size of another plane) and will eventually power Boeing’s 777X, the biggest twinjet ever. Despite its heft, though, the behemoth is cleaner, quieter, and more fuel-efficient than its predecessors. Flight-testing starts this year, and by 2020 you might see a GE9X from seat 36A.

Improved 3-D-design software enabled engineers to create more-aerodynamic blades. These are made of carbon fiber, not titanium, substantially lessening the load on the engine.

Air - Fuel - Combustion - Chamber - Compression

The more densely packed the air is, the less fuel required in the combustion chamber. A 27:1 compression ratio makes the GE9X burn fuel 10 percent more efficiently than the current 777 engine, saving money and lowering emissions.

Air...
(Excerpt) Read more at: WIRED
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