US Health Report: Exercising More, But Mental Health Suffers

Live Science | 1/11/2017 | Staff
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How healthy are people in the U.S.? A new federal report shows that although the country has made progress in some areas, such as increasing how much exercise people get and lowering the number of teens who smoke cigarettes, it's fallen behind in others, particularly in taking care of mental health.

The new report, published today (Jan. 11) by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), detailed the country's progress in meeting a set of 10-year national health goals that were set in 2010 as part of an initiative called Healthy People 2020.

Initiative - Improvements - Measures - Health - Range

The initiative called for improvements in 26 different measures of public health, covering a wide range of areas including access to health care services, mental health, quality of the environment, and rates of injuries and violence.

So far, the U.S. has met or exceeded eight of the 26 objectives, and has made progress toward meeting another eight of the goals, the report said. However, in seven areas, the country has seen "little or no detectable change," and in three, the U.S. is moving in the wrong direction, the report said.

Report - US - Objectives - Improvements - Health

The new report shows that the U.S. has met the national objectives for improvements in maternal, infant and child health: The national rates of infant deaths and rates of preterm live births before 37 weeks of pregnancy have both dropped down to goal levels since 2007.

And fewer teens now report using illegal drugs, alcohol or tobacco in the previous 30 days, the report found.

Addition - People - US - Goals - Quality

In addition, people in the U.S. exceeded both of the goals in the "environmental quality" section of the Healthy People 2020 initiative: The proportion of children ages 3 to 11 who are exposed to secondhand smoke dropped from 52 percent in 2005-2008 to 41 percent in 2009-2012, and the number of days with poor air...
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