280 million-year-old fossil reveals origins of chimaeroid fishes

ScienceDaily | 1/4/2017 | Staff
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This discovery, published early online in Nature on Jan. 4, allows scientists to firmly anchor chimaeroids -- the last major surviving vertebrate group to be properly situated on the tree of life -- in evolutionary history, and sheds light on the early development of these fish as they diverged from their deep, shared ancestry with sharks.

"Chimaeroids belong somewhere close to the sharks and rays, but there's always been uncertainty when you search deeper in time for their evolutionary branching point," said Michael Coates, PhD, professor of organismal biology and anatomy at the University of Chicago, who led the study.

Chimaeras - Span - Fossil - Record - Coates

"Chimaeras are unusual throughout the long span of their fossil record," Coates said. "Because of this, it's been difficult to understand how they got to be the way they are in the first place. This discovery sheds new light not only on the early evolution of shark-like fishes, but also on jawed vertebrates as a whole."

Chimaeras include about 50 living species, known in various parts of the world as ratfish, rabbit fish, ghost sharks, St. Joseph sharks or elephant sharks. They represent one of four fundamental divisions of modern vertebrate biodiversity. With large eyes and tooth plates adapted for grinding prey, these deep-water dwelling fish are far from the bloodthirsty killer sharks of Hollywood.

Years - Biologists - Marine - Animals - Account

For more than 100 years, they have fascinated biologists. "There are few of the marine animals that on account of structure and relationships to other forms living and extinct have as great interest for zoologists and palaeontologists as the Chimaeroids," wrote Harvard naturalist Samuel Garman in 1904. More than a century later, the relationship between chimaeras, the earliest sharks, and other early jawed fishes in the fossil record continues to puzzle paleontologists.

Chimaeras -- named for their similarities to a mythical creature described by Homer as "lion-fronted and snake behind,...
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