Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas

phys.org | 8/1/2018 | Staff
Emzah92Emzah92 (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://scx2.b-cdn.net/gfx/news/hires/2019/turningmoref.jpg

Anaerobic digesters, like those pictured here, can be used to convert sewage sludge and fatty waste into natural gas. Photo credit: Rachel Schowalter. Shared by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center under a Creative Commons license.

North Carolina State University researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into methane.

Sewage - Wastewater - Treatment - Plants - Sludge

After treating sewage, wastewater treatment plants are left with solid sludge, called biosolids. For years, utilities have treated biosolids with microbes that produce methane. In recent years, utilities have been adding grease interceptor waste (GIW) into the mix.

Grease interceptors are used to trap fat, oil and grease from food service establishments so that they don't clog up sewers. By adding GIW in with their biosolids, utilities can produce more methane, making the entire operation more efficient. But there are challenges.

Biosolids - GIW - Source - Energy - Goal

"Turning biosolids and GIW into a renewable source of clean energy is a laudable goal," says Francis de los Reyes, a professor of civil, construction and environmental engineering at NC State and lead author of a paper on the work. "But if you add too much GIW into the anaerobic digester they use to treat biosolids, the system goes haywire—and methane production plummets.

"Our goal with this work was to figure out the best balance of biosolids and GIW for maximizing methane production. And we were able to make significant advances."

Researchers

The researchers determined that...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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