Fireball That Flew Over Japan in 2017 Was Tiny Piece of Giant Asteroid that Might One Day Threaten Earth

livescience.com | 10/20/2019 | Rafi Letzter - Staff Writer
Click For Photo: https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/GdQWSkSgPgXMThS4JhiLrA-1200-80.png

In the early morning of April 28, 2017, a small fireball crept across the sky over Kyoto, Japan. And now, thanks to data collected by the SonotaCo meteor survey, researchers have determined that the fiery space rock was a shard of a much larger asteroid that might (far down the road) threaten Earth.

The meteor that burned over Japan was tiny. Studying the SonotaCo data, the researchers determined that the object entered the atmosphere with a mass of about 1 ounce (29 grams) and was just 1 inch (2.7 centimeters) across. It didn't threaten anyone. But small meteors like this are interesting because they can offer data on the bigger objects that spawn them. And in this case, the researchers tracked the little rock back to its parent: an object known as 2003 YT1.

YT1 - Asteroid - Rock - Miles - Kilometers

2003 YT1 is a binary asteroid, composed of one large rock about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) across orbited by a smaller asteroid that's 690 feet (210 meters) long. Discovered in 2003, the binary system has a 6% chance of hitting Earth at some point in the next 10 million years. That makes the object what researchers call a "potentially hazardous object," even though it's unlikely to hurt anyone in your lifetime.

The binary didn't pass by Earth in 2017, so there wasn't an immediately obvious link between the meteor and its parent. But the researchers studied how the fireball moved across the sky and were able to reverse-engineer the object's orbit through space, pinning it to 2003 YT1 with a high degree of certainty.

Researchers - Rock - YT1 - Part - Stream

The researchers said they aren't sure how the little rock split off from 2003 YT1 but believe it's part of a larger stream of dust that got flung off of the asteroid. And they offered a few potential explanations for how that stream formed: Maybe...
(Excerpt) Read more at: livescience.com
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!