Scientists find early humans moved through Mediterranean earlier than believed

phys.org | 7/10/2019 | Staff
fufu-fefefufu-fefe (Posted by) Level 4
Click For Photo: https://scx2.b-cdn.net/gfx/news/hires/2019/5da72047e241c.jpg




An international research team led by scientists from McMaster University has unearthed new evidence in Greece proving that the island of Naxos was inhabited by Neanderthals and earlier humans at least 200,000 years ago, tens of thousands of years earlier than previously believed.

The findings, published today in the journal Science Advances, are based on years of excavations and challenge current thinking about human movement in the region—long thought to have been inaccessible and uninhabitable to anyone but modern humans. The new evidence is leading researchers to reconsider the routes our early ancestors took as they moved out of Africa into Europe and demonstrates their ability to adapt to new environmental challenges.

Part - World - Studies - Results - History

"Until recently, this part of the world was seen as irrelevant to early human studies but the results force us to completely rethink the history of the Mediterranean islands," says Tristan Carter, an associate professor of anthropology at McMaster University and lead author on the study. He conducted the work with Dimitris Athanasoulis, head of archaeology at the Cycladic Ephorate of Antiquities within the Greek Ministry of Culture.

While Stone Age hunters are known to have been living on mainland Europe for over 1 million years, the Mediterranean islands were previously believed to be settled only 9,000 years ago, by farmers, the idea being that only modern humans—Homo sapiens—were sophisticated enough to build seafaring vessels.

Scholars - Aegean - Sea - Anatolia - Turkey

Scholars had believed the Aegean Sea, separating western Anatolia (modern Turkey) from continental Greece, was therefore impassable to the Neanderthals and earlier hominins, with the only obvious route in and out of Europe was across the land bridge of...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Do you exist for Something or Nothing?
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!