The Man Who Found the Titanic Just Ended His Search for Amelia Earhart's Lost Plane

livescience.com | 10/16/2019 | Yasemin Saplakoglu - Staff Writer
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This summer, the explorer who discovered the shipwreck of the Titanic went in search of Amelia Earhart's lost plane. Two weeks and a multimillion-dollar search later, Robert Ballard said he has found no hint of it, according to The New York Times.

Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan disappeared over the Pacific Ocean 82 years ago — on a journey that would have made Earhart the first female aviator to circle the globe. Her vanishing has led to numerous search efforts and spawned several conspiracy theories, but no one has been able to find conclusive evidence as to where she might have gone.

Theory - Nonprofit - International - Group - Historic

One theory, advocated by the nonprofit The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), is that her plane, the Lockheed Model 10 Electra, crashed into the coral reefs of Nikumaroro, a tiny atoll that is part of the Phoenix Islands in the South Pacific. According to this theory, Earhart likely survived the crash and lived for some time on the uninhabited island.

Ballard first became interested in Nikumaroro after seeing a photo known as the Bevington image, taken on the island by a British officer in 1940. When enhanced, the photo revealed an object similar to landing gear from the Electra, according to the Times.

August - Ballard - Team - Research - Nautilus

In August, Ballard and his team set off on their research vessel the "Nautilus," to explore in and around Nikumaroro. The trip was funded by National Geographic Partners and the National Geographic Society, which is releasing a documentary about Earhart, including footage from the expedition on Sunday (Oct. 20).

The team mapped the island with sonar and a floating surface vehicle — and they employed remotely operated vehicles to explore the deeper crevices of the underwater mountain that Nikumaroro is a part of. The team even searched 4 nautical miles out and came up with...
(Excerpt) Read more at: livescience.com
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