New evolution-busting drug overcomes resistance in aggressive breast cancers

ScienceDaily | 10/5/2019 | Staff
Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, found that the drug could reinvigorate the response to chemotherapy in cancers that had become resistant, in both cells grown in the lab and in mice.

The drug, known as BOS172722, works by forcing cancer cells through cell division too quickly -- leading to fatal errors in parcelling out DNA.

Trial - Treatment - Way - Tumours - Breast

The first clinical trial of the new treatment is now under way in solid tumours including aggressive triple-negative breast cancers -- and the researchers believe it might also be effective against other fast-growing cancers including ovarian cancer.

The new study is published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics and was funded by The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) -- a charity and research institute -- as well as by Cancer Research UK, Breast Cancer Now and Sixth Element Capital LLP.

BOS172722 - Example - Therapies - Focus - ICR

BOS172722 is an example of one of the new evolution-busting therapies that will be the focus of the ICR's planned £75 million Centre for Cancer Drug Discovery.

The drug was discovered at the ICR in the Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit. It blocks a molecule called MPS1, which plays a central role in controlling cell division.

MPS1 - Organisation - Chromosomes - Cell - Division

MPS1 is involved in organisation of chromosomes during cell division, ensuring they are distributed correctly between daughter cells and making sure that cell division doesn't go ahead until they have been parcelled out evenly.

By blocking MPS1 using the new drugs, cancer cells speed through cell division with the wrong number of chromosomes and die as a consequence.

ICR - Researchers - Cancer - Cells - Dishes

The ICR researchers found that cancer cells in dishes treated with the MPS1 inhibitor went through cell division in just 11 minutes, compared with 52 minutes without the drug.

And fast-dividing cells, from triple-negative breast cancers, ovarian and lung cancers, were especially sensitive to the effects of blocking MPS1.

People - Breast - Cancer - Taxane

Currently, people with triple-negative breast cancer receive taxane...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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