Anthropologist contributes to major study of large animal extinction

ScienceDaily | 9/20/2019 | Staff
tictac399 (Posted by) Level 3
In their study published today in Science, researchers from Australia, the United States, Canada and Finland showed that humans shaped the processes underlying how species co-existed for the last several thousand years. Smaller, surviving animals such as deer changed their ecological interactions, the researchers found, causing ecological upheaval across the continent.

The researchers' work has implications for conservation of today's remaining large animals, now threatened by another human-led mass extinction.

Study - Author - Anikó - Tóth - Macquarie

The study's primary author is Anikó Tóth at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. Tóth collaborated with Villaseñor and several other researchers at the Smithsonian's Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystems Program, as well as researchers at other institutions.

Tóth and the co-authors focused on how large mammals were distributed across the continent in the Pleistocene and Holocene geological epochs. (The Pleistocene Epoch occurred from about 2.5 million to 11,700 years ago. Starting at the end of the Pleistocene, the Holocene is the current geological epoch.) To do this, the researchers analyzed how often pairs of species were found living in the same community or in different communities.

Community - Changes - Result - Diversity

To rule out community changes that were the result of reduced diversity or lost...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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