Archaeologists dig up the Victorian burial ground where Birmingham's HS2 station will go

Mail Online | 9/20/2019 | Jack Elsom For Mailonline
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Time-lapse footage has shown archaeologists digging up a Victorian burial ground where 6,500 people were buried as they pave the way for the controversial HS2 railway line.

A team of 70 archaeologists spent a year excavating the 19th-century Park Street site in Birmingham where a station on the high-speed route is set to be built.

Combing - Ground - Treasure - Trove - Artifacts

Forensic combing of the burial ground also found a treasure trove of historical artifacts including figurines, coins, toys and necklaces inside the coffins.

Along with the thousands of skeletons, these items will now be examined and informed by historical documents, such as parish records and wills, to develop detailed biographies of the individuals.

Footage - Archaeologists - Dig - Lays - Excavation

Time-lapse footage charting the archaeologists' dig lays bare the mammoth excavation task they embarked on during the last 12 months.

Park Street burial ground was opened in 1810 as an overflow cemetery for St Martin-in-the-Bullring and stayed open for only 63 years. It closed to public burials in 1873.

Claire - Cogar - Lead - Archaeologist - MOLA

Claire Cogar, Lead Archaeologist from MOLA Headland, said: 'The careful and fascinating excavation of Park Street burial ground is telling us a great deal of the effects of life in 19th-century Birmingham on the population.

'We hope to build a picture of the lives of the people who built Birmingham and made the city what it is today, from the diseases they suffered and what they ate, to where they came from.

Findings - Evidence - Diseases - Scurvy - Rickets

'Our initial findings have already identified evidence of diseases including scurvy and rickets.

'We have also found interesting objects placed into burials. One burial contained a bone-handled knife, another had a figurine and others contained dinner plates.

Finds - Insights - Types - Rituals - Traditions

'These finds provide insights into the types of burial rituals, traditions and practices of the 19th-century.'

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(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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