Researchers advance noise cancelling for quantum computers

phys.org | 4/18/2016 | Staff
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A team from Dartmouth College and MIT has designed and conducted the first lab test to successfully detect and characterize a class of complex, "non-Gaussian" noise processes that are routinely encountered in superconducting quantum computing systems.

The characterization of non-Gaussian noise in superconducting quantum bits is a critical step toward making these systems more precise.

Study - Nature - Communications - Realization - Systems

The joint study, published in Nature Communications, could help accelerate the realization of quantum computing systems. The experiment was based on earlier theoretical research conducted at Dartmouth and published in Physical Review Letters in 2016.

"This is the first concrete step toward trying to characterize more complicated types of noise processes than commonly assumed in the quantum domain," said Lorenza Viola, a professor of physics at Dartmouth who led the 2016 study as well as the theory component of the present work. "As qubit coherence properties are being constantly improved, it is important to detect non-Gaussian noise in order to build the most precise quantum systems possible."

Quantum - Computers - Computers - Physics - Quantum

Quantum computers differ from traditional computers by going beyond the binary "on-off" sequencing favored by classical physics. Quantum computers rely on quantum bits—also known as qubits—that are built out of atomic and subatomic particles.

Essentially, qubits can be placed in a combination of both "on" and "off" positions at the same time. They can also be "entangled," meaning that the properties of one qubit can influence another over a distance.

Qubit - Systems - Contenders - Race - Quantum

Superconducting qubit systems are considered one of the leading contenders in the race to build scalable, high-performing quantum computers. But, like other qubit platforms, they are highly sensitive to their environment and can be affected by both external noise and internal noise.

External noise in quantum computing systems could come from control electronics or stray magnetic fields. Internal noise could come from other uncontrolled quantum systems such as material impurities. The ability to reduce noise...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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