Macron’s $15 Billion Offer to Iran: More Than Meets The Eye?

Center for Security Policy | 9/10/2019 | Christopher Holton
Emzah92 (Posted by) Level 3
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French President Emmanuel Macron has floated the concept of essentially giving Iran $15 billion to comply with the infamous multilateral nuclear deal that the Ayatollahs have already violated.

Some observers see Macron’s proposal as a statesman-like proposal to preserve peace and avoid war. Others believe that the Macron is making an effort to rehabilitate his own image domestically in France, since that nation has been beleaguered with riots and unrest virtually since the day Macron entered office.

Possibility - Greed

A third possibility exists: greed.

Before the Iran nuclear agreement, America’s robust sanctions regime, combined with an international divestment campaign—largely led by the Center for Security Policy’s Divest Terror Initiative—resulted in numerous corporations from around the world pulling their business from Iran.

Nation - NATO - France - Nation - Corporations

No nation in NATO was more impacted by this than France because no nation’s corporations did more business in Iran than those of France.

For decades after the Islamic revolution of 1979 in Iran, huge French conglomerates led the charge to provide corporate life support for the Ayatollahs, despite Iran’s long record as the world’s most active state sponsor of terrorism:

Example - Alcatel - Lucent - Nokia - Telecommunications

For example, Alcatel, which merged with Lucent and was subsequently acquired by Nokia, completed major telecommunications projects in Iran which helped Iran modernize its telecommunications infrastructure…the same telecommunications infrastructure that Iran reportedly used to network its air defense systems. After completion of these projects the firm pulled out of Iran as international pressure increased.

French firm Alstom helped Iran to generate electrical power nationwide with gas turbine equipment and services.

France - Bank - BNP - Paribas - Business

France’s largest bank, BNP Paribas, conducted major business in and with Iran. The bank claimed to be winding down its business there in 2007 thanks to international scrutiny, but it appears that it wasn’t sufficiently following through because, in 2015, BNP Paribas was forced to...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Center for Security Policy
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