New images from asteroid probe offer clues on planet formation

phys.org | 10/3/2018 | Staff
j.moomin (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://scx2.b-cdn.net/gfx/news/hires/2019/5d5ee845113c9.jpg

Photographs snapped by a shoebox-sized probe that explored the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu have offered new clues about its composition, insights that will help scientists understand the formation of our solar system.

The German-French Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT) hitched a ride on Japan's Hayabusa2 spaceship, touching down on the 900-meter (3,000 feet) wide asteroid, whose orbit lies mostly between Earth and Mars, on October 3, 2018.

Ryugu - Gravity - Times - Earth - Motion

Ryugu's gravity is 66,500 times weaker than Earth's, and the forward motion of wheels would have launched MASCOT back into space.

So it instead hopped around the surface using the tiny amount of momentum generated by a metal swing arm attached to its boxy body, which weighed 10 kilograms (22 pounds).

Addition - Readings - Measurements - MASCOT - Series

In addition to taking temperature readings and other measurements, MASCOT reeled off a series of pictures showing the asteroid is covered with rocks and boulders that fall into one of two categories: dark and rough with crumbly surfaces that resemble cauliflowers, or bright and smooth.

"The interesting thing there is it really shows that Ryugu is the product of some kind of violent process," Ralf Jaumann of the German Aerospace Center and the lead author of a paper describing the findings in the journal Science on...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!