Russia Launches Humanoid Robot 'Fyodor' to Space Station on Rare Soyuz Test Flight

Space.com | 8/22/2019 | Elizabeth Howell
nallynally (Posted by) Level 4
Click For Photo: https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/JmpWjZXjm2NHnQ8PA6TfEG-1200-80.jpg




Call it one giant leap for a robot. Russia has launched a humanoid robot named "Fyodor" to the International Space Station on the first uncrewed Soyuz spacecraft ever to visit the orbiting laboratory.

The Soyuz capsule — which typically carries a crew of three into space — lifted off with food, supplies and the Skybot F-850 robot from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan late Wednesday (Aug. 21) at 11:38 p.m. EDT (0338 Aug. 22 GMT) It was 8:38 a.m. Thursday local time at the launch site.

Soyuz - Capsule - Orbit - Soyuz - Rocket

The Soyuz capsule launched into orbit atop a Soyuz 2.1a rocket, a variant of Russia's workhorse booster that has only flown uncrewed Progress vehicles until now. Its Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft is carrying 1,450 lbs. (660 kilograms) of supplies for the station's six-person crew.

"A flawless climb to orbit for Soyuz MS-14 in its test flight, the first launch of a Soyuz vehicle on a 2.1a booster," NASA spokesperson Rob Navias said during live launch commentary.

Soyuz - Rocket - Launches - Soyuz - Capsule

A Russian Soyuz 2.1a rocket launches an uncrewed Soyuz capsule carrying the humanoid robot Skybot F-850, nicknamed "Fyodor," on a test flight from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan.

Liftoff occurred at 8:38 a.m. local time on Aug. 22, 2019.

Soyuz - Rocket - Launches - Soyuz - Capsule

A Russian Soyuz 2.1a rocket launches an uncrewed Soyuz capsule carrying the humanoid robot Skybot F-850, nicknamed "Fyodor," on a test flight from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan.

Liftoff occurred at 8:38 a.m. local time on Aug. 22, 2019.

Navias - Russia - Skybot - F-850 - Fyodor

Navias said Russia's Skybot F-850, affectionately nicknamed "Fyodor," appeared to be doing well as it sat in the commander's seat of the Soyuz spacecraft. A television view from inside the Soyuz showed the robot clutching a small Russian flag in its right hand as a toy cosmonaut bobbed around the cabin as a zero-gravity indicator.

"He made it to orbit and is en route to the International Space Station," Navias said...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Space.com
Wake Up To Breaking News!
He is faithful!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!