APPLE'S BATTERY 'SERVICE' ALERTS ARE A BLOW AGAINST RIGHT TO REPAIR

WIRED | 8/13/2019 | Lauren Goode
shardonay (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://media.wired.com/photos/5d52923506bced00094a3631/191:100/pass/gear_iphone_1158948323.jpg

Last week, YouTuber Justin Ashford swapped the original battery in an iPhone XR with one he bought from an electronics market in Shenzhen. Ashford runs a channel called TheArtofRepair, which features videos about repairing electronics. This latest repair video wasn’t just an ordinary battery swap. It was a pointed message to Apple.

The external battery he put into the iPhone XR, Ashford says, was an “original” iPhone battery—meaning, it was the same battery pack you’d find if you cracked open your shiny new 2018 iPhone. But after the swap, when Ashford went into the battery section of the iPhone’s settings, he noticed an alert: “Service.”

IPhone - Battery - Health - Settings - Measurement

Normally, if you tap on the iPhone's “Battery Health” settings, you'd see a measurement of your battery’s maximum capacity, but that’s it. Ashford’s battery swap had changed the language.

The video caught the eye of iFixIt, a computer repair company based in San Luis Obispo, California. Besides repairing stuff, iFixIt publishes blog posts that expose the inner workings of gadgets, sometimes to the chagrin of electronics manufacturers. “We were able to replicate it on an iPhone XS running both iOS 12 and the iOS 13 beta,” iFixit writer Craig Lloyd detailed in a post, less than 24 hours after Ashford’s video published. Dig even deeper into the “Service” alert after swapping your battery, Lloyd wrote, and you’ll find an “important battery message” that says Apple is “unable to verify that this iPhone has a genuine Apple battery.”

Consumer - Repair - Hands - Battery - Service

To the average consumer who decides to take a repair into their own hands, ordering a new battery and swapping it themselves, the “Service” alert is likely little more than another setting to be ignored. In short: It’s likely to still work, unless you’ve purchased a total dud.

But to people like Ashford and the team at iFixit, the “Service” warning represents another...
(Excerpt) Read more at: WIRED
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