BBC trials technology that will make dialogue easier to follow 

Mail Online | 7/26/2019 | Henry Goodwin For The Daily Mail;Victoria Bell For Mailonline
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Booming soundtracks and incomprehensible actors often make television hard to follow - until now.

The BBC is trialling technology that will allow viewers to tune out background noise, boost characters' voices and - hopefully - make plots easier to follow.

Episode - BBC - One - Drama - Casualty

A recent episode of BBC One medical drama Casualty was the first show to be made with the new tool, The Times reported.

A version of the episode on the BBC website now features a slider button - moving it to the right retains the standard audio and shifting it to the left reduces background noise, music included, to make the dialogue clearer.

Project - Britons - Loss - Others - Actors

The project is targeted at the 11 million Britons with hearing loss and any others who struggle to make out what actors are saying.

Commuters streaming shows on noisy buses and trains could also benefit from the technology.

Viewers - Thousands - Complaints - BBC - Dialogue

Frustrated viewers have filed thousands of complaints with the BBC after they were unable to make out the dialogue in tense dramas like Jamaica Inn and Happy Valley.

Their anger prompted a national debate about actors who don't enunciate - with the issue even being raised in parliament.

Lord - Blunkett - Labour - Home - Secretary

Lord Blunkett, the former Labour home secretary, who is blind, criticised actors who tried to create atmosphere by mumbling on-screen in 2017.

'Atmosphere is fine if you can lip read,' he said in the House of Lords. 'When you can't, the mumbling becomes not just an irritant, but an impossibility.'

Element - Sound - Programme - Hierarchy

Each individual element of sound in a programme is graded in a hierarchy based on how important...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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