The Love of Learning (Guest Voice Jake Carr)

Eidos | 7/19/2019 | Staff
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I asked for new voices and Jake Carr stepped up . . . Mr. Carr graduated from Biola University and the Torrey Honors Institute in 2015. His is currently working towards a PhD in Philosophy and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Learning and teaching are his greatest loves, save only the love for his wife, Dawnielle, and his son, Rémi.

Mr. Carr take the wheel:

Quotation - Readings - Classical - Chinese - Philosophy

The following quotation is from Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy, edited by Philip J. Ivanjoe and Bryan W. Van Norden.

Duke Ai asked [Confucius], “Who among your disciples might be said to love learning?”

Kongzi - Confucius - Yan - **** - Learning

Kongzi [Confucius] answered, “There was one named Yan **** who loved learning. He never misdirected his anger, and never made the same mistake twice. Unfortunately, his allotted lifespan was short, and he has passed away. Now that he is gone, there are none who really love learning – at least, I have yet to hear of one.”

No school should exist without a Yan **** award. Any student worthy of it would outshine the Valedictorian a hundred fold.

Confucius - Signs - Love - Yan - ****

Confucius gives two signs by which we can recognize the true love of learning. Yan **** had both. He never misdirected his anger, and he never made the same mistake twice.

Misdirected anger?

Instance - Anger - Judgement - Act - Disturbance

Any instance of anger involves 1) A judgement that sees a particular act as wrong, 2) A painful disturbance of feelings, and 3) A desire for vindicatio, where vindicatio is understood to be pursuit of redress, or punishment.

In order to never misdirect anger, Yan **** must have always judged the just and the unjust correctly. Only a soul profoundly committed to what is good and true could ever arrive to such a state. Only a soul distinctly unselfish could ever have the purity of mind to track the just and the unjust in this way. Confucius suggests...
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