The pro-privacy Browser Act has re-appeared in US Congress. But why does everyone except right-wing trolls hate it?

www.theregister.co.uk | 7/18/2019 | Staff
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Comment A bi-partisan law bill that promises to give internet users far greater control over their privacy made another appearance in US Congress on Thursday.

The proposed law would require ISPs as well as social media giants to get user consent before collecting and selling their data, and force those same companies to continue to supply their services even if a user refuses to provide consent.

Bill - Sponsor - Senate - Progress - Legislation

The bill's main sponsor appeared in the Senate to note the progress that has been made with the legislation and to flag the creation of a new tech task force that will "find answers to the issues of privacy and data security" when it comes to internet companies.

All of which is exactly what lawmakers, consumer advocates, privacy groups and the media have been arguing for months is needed. So why does everyone hate the Browser Act?

Answer - Law - Media - Outlet - Marsha

One unfortunate answer lies in who is proposing the new law and the media outlet that is aggressively backing it: Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and Breitbart respectively.

It is especially unusual to see Senator Blackburn pushing a law that enhances internet users' privacy because she has been one of the strongest voices in opposition to that very goal.

FCC - Rules - Privacy - Requirements - Bill

She not only opposed FCC rules that would have required the exact-same privacy protecting requirements but authored a bill (when she was in the House) that would have permanently prevented the FCC from adding such protections in future.

She is an active advocate for opening up Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act that protects internet platforms from being sued for their users' actions. And she was the point person for claims that social media companies were censoring conservative speech: she created a video that broke Twitter's terms of use and then embarked on a full-blown media campaign when the company blocked it.

Effort

Was it a deliberate effort...
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