Chandrayaan 2 mission to moon's south pole now set to launch on July 22

CNET | 7/18/2019 | Jackson Ryan
abbycraig (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://cnet1.cbsistatic.com/img/8JxHxVm70GBh18lOEzVus_tml-M=/756x567/2019/07/13/356ee4ca-eaf1-4fb9-9b05-8b801aece786/gslvvmk3.jpg




The GSLV-MkIII launches from Sriharikota in 2017. For the Chandrayaan-2 mission, it will launch a suite of robots to the moon's south pole.

Chandrayaan 2, India's exploration mission to the moon's south pole, is set to fly to the moon on July 22. The launch, which has suffered several delays was originally scheduled for July 14, but the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) postponed Chandrayaan 2's departure less than an hour before launch due to a "technical snag."

Landmark - Mission - Days - Anniversary - Apollo

The landmark mission is now set to depart a few days after the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, humanity's first crewed lunar landing, with the goal of making the first soft landing at the lunar south pole. India's mission isn't slated to feature humans, rather, Chandrayaan 2 is carrying three lunar exploration robots -- a lander, rover and orbiter -- that will be able to survey the moon from both the surface and the sky.

The launch is set to take place at India's Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, north of Chennai, at the revised (and slightly unfriendly time) of 2:13 a.m. PT (5:13 a.m. ET), Monday July 22.

Payload - Chandrayaan-2 - Consists - Lunar - Orbiter

The payload of Chandrayaan-2 consists of a lunar orbiter, a lunar lander and a lunar rover and will be launched atop the ISRO-developed GSLV Mk-III rocket. That rocket is about half as powerful as the SpaceX Falcon 9 and will put Chandrayaan-2 into what's known as an "Earth parking orbit" before the module uses its own power to extend its orbit and eventually position itself for a lunar rendezvous.

Want to tune in to the historic mission? During the first run of the mission on July 14, ISRO handled livestreaming duties across its social media pages, which meant you could tune in at the ISRO Twitter or follow along on the agency's Facebook page. India's...
(Excerpt) Read more at: CNET
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