Trump expected to end his fight to add citizenship question to census, sources say

ABC News | 7/11/2019 | Staff
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President Donald Trump is expected to announce later Thursday he is backing down from his effort to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census, and will instead take executive action that instructs the Commerce Department to obtain an estimate of U.S. citizenship through other means, according to multiple sources familiar with the matter.

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The expected announcement would bring to a close weeks of escalating confusion within the government over his demands that the controversial question be included in the census despite a Supreme Court order that had blocked the move. The White House declined to comment about what exactly the president plans to announce.

Thursday - Morning - Administration - Officials - President

As recently as Thursday morning, administration officials had been repeatedly suggested the president would take executive action calling for the question be added to the census. It was not immediately clear when and why the final decision was made not to move forward with that plan.

Attorney General William Barr, who was expected to attend the announcement, will now have to determine a path forward for three separate ongoing court cases the administration is fighting in Maryland, California and New York over the administration's efforts to add the question to the census.

Department - Justice - ABC - News

The Department of Justice declined to comment to ABC News.

The expected announcement follows the government's acknowledgement in court last week that census forms continued to be printed without the question, in compliance with the Supreme Court's order last month.

Majority - Opinion - Chief - Justice - John

In a majority opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote that the administration's previous stated reasoning that it wanted the question added to better enforce the Voting Rights Act, "seems to have been contrived." However, Roberts also left open the possibility that the question could...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ABC News
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