Communion Wine

Cranach | 7/5/2019 | Staff
superdudea (Posted by) Level 3
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Visiting South Australia often entails visiting lots of wineries. We stopped at Sevenhill winery in the Clare Valley, which is owned by the Jesuits and which produces all of the sacramental wine for the Catholic church of Australia. I learned some things about communion wine that I never realized before, making me curious about Lutheran and other churches’ practices.

Sevenhill sacramental wine, I was told, is made according to the exacting standards and requirements of canon law. So its characteristics will apply to most wine used in the Roman Catholic Church.

Alcohol - Alcohol - Kills - Germs - Cup

Why the high alcohol? I was told that the higher alcohol kills germs in the common cup and preserves the wine longer after it is opened. (Once you open a bottle of table wine, you usually need to drink it up. Churches use a relatively small amount of wine in their communion rites, so a fortified wine can last from week to week.) Of course, the tiny sip taken by communicants is not going to impair anyone.

I was told that Lutheran churches in Australia do not typically use this “Catholic” wine, though they could; rather, they tend to use “Lutheran” wines produced in the Barossa Valley, where Lutheran immigrants started the Australian wine industry and where Lutherans are still heavily involved, particularly in the small family-run wineries, which often...
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