Wow! This Is What SpaceX's Starlink Satellites Look Like in the Night Sky

Space.com | 5/25/2019 | Tariq Malik
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Click For Photo: https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/uwxXhvy8WC2ukLTMERQeee-1200-80.jpg







You've never seen a night sky sight quite like this.

It's been one day since SpaceX launched its first 60 Starlink internet satellites into orbit, and a skywatching sleuth has already spotted them soaring across the night sky. Netherlands-based satellite tracker Marco Langbroek stunned space fans tonight (May 24) with this jaw-dropping video of dozens of Starlink satellites soaring overhead.

Video - Langbroek - SatTrackCam - Leiden - Blog

"Here is the video I shot, be prepared to be mind-blown!" Langbroek wrote on his website SatTrackCam Leiden Blog, where he shared the video. He counted at least 56 objects as the satellites flew overhead.

Related: SpaceX's 1st Starlink Satellite Megaconstellation Launch in Photos!

Train - SpaceX - Starlink - Satellites - Night

A train of SpaceX Starlink satellites are visible in the night sky in this still from a video captured by satellite tracker Marco Langbroek in Leiden, the Netherlands on May 24, 2019, just one day after SpaceX launched 60 of the Starlink internet communications satellites into orbit.

A view of SpaceX's first 60 Starlink satellites in orbit, still in stacked configuration, with the Earth as a brilliant blue backdrop on May 23, 2019.

Video - SpaceX - Starlink - Overhead - String

In the video, SpaceX's Starlink satellites pass overhead like a string of pearls, a brilliant trail of moving lights in the night sky. SpaceX launched the satellites into an initial orbit 273 miles (440 kilometers) above Earth. They are making their way to a final orbit 342 miles (550 km) up.

SpaceX CEO and founder Elon Musk hinted on Twitter today that the satellites are doing well. "So far, so good," he wrote.

Langbroek - Knowledge - SpaceX - Altitude - Target

Langbroek said he used the knowledge of SpaceX's deployment altitude and target orbital inclination (the angle of the orbit with respect to the equator) to estimate where the satellites would appear in Friday night's sky.

"Turned out my orbit estimate was not bad," Langbroek told Space.com in an email, adding that "the sky track...
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