Virtual reality can spot navigation problems in early Alzheimer's disease

ScienceDaily | 5/23/2019 | Staff
Goobee (Posted by) Level 4
The study highlights the potential of new technologies to help diagnose and monitor conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, which affects more than 525,000 people in the UK.

In 2014, Professor John O'Keefe of UCL was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 'discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain'. Essentially, this means that the brain contains a mental 'satnav' of where we are, where we have been, and how to find our way around.

Component - Satnav - Region - Brain - Cortex

A key component of this internal satnav is a region of the brain known as the entorhinal cortex. This is one of the first regions to be damaged in Alzheimer's disease, which may explain why 'getting lost' is one of the first symptoms of the disease. However, the pen-and-paper cognitive tests used in clinic to diagnose the condition are unable to test for navigation difficulties.

In collaboration with Professor Neil Burgess at UCL, a team of scientists at the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge led by Dr Dennis Chan, previously Professor O'Keefe's PhD student, developed and trialled a VR navigation test in patients at risk of developing dementia. The results of their study are published today in the journal Brain.

Test - Dons - VR - Headset - Test

In the test, a patient dons a VR headset and undertakes a test of navigation while walking within a simulated environment. Successful completion of the task requires intact functioning of the entorhinal cortex, so Dr Chan's team hypothesised that patients with early Alzheimer's disease would be disproportionately affected on the test.

The team recruited 45 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from the Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust Mild Cognitive Impairment and Memory Clinics. Patients with MCI typically exhibit memory impairment, but while MCI can indicate early Alzheimer's, it can also be caused by other conditions such as anxiety and...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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