Fiber-based imaging spectrometer captures record amounts of data

phys.org | 10/24/2018 | Staff
Emzah92 (Posted by) Level 3
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Researchers have developed a new compact, fiber-based imaging spectrometer for remote sensing that can capture 30,000 sampling points each containing more than 60 wavelengths. This rich spectral information combined with high spatial resolution provides valuable insight into the chemical makeup of a scene or sample.

"Compact imaging spectrometers such as the one we developed can be used on unmanned aerial vehicles to help increase crop production or inform response after a disaster based on detected pollution," said research team leader Tomasz S. Tkaczyk from Rice University. "In the biomedical field, the system could increase the efficiency of diagnostic tests or help scientists better understand biological processes."

Optical - Society - OSA - Journal - Optics

In The Optical Society (OSA) journal Optics Express, the researchers show that their instrument can provide about an order of magnitude more information than has been reported for other fiber-based systems. The device measures only 600 x 150 x 150 millimeters—almost small enough for use aboard unmanned aerial vehicles. The researchers say that the instrument could be made even smaller while capturing more than 100 wavelengths from up to 250,000 points.

The new spectrometer acquires spectral information instantaneously without requiring any scanning. This allows it to image quickly changing objects such as moving targets or changing imaging conditions.

Spectrometers - Fiber - Bundle - Image - Detector

Imaging spectrometers can use a fiber bundle to transfer the spectral image to a detector or detector array. Spectrometers incorporating this setup usually feature a bundle of fibers arranged in a square at the input end and a single line at the detector end. This means that the number of fibers, and thus spatial resolution, is limited by the dimensions...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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