Correction: Navajo Nation-Electricity story

ABC News | 5/20/2019 | Staff
gemini2323 (Posted by) Level 3
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In a story May 18 about electricity on the Navajo Nation, The Associated Press erroneously reported the name of a senior vice president at the American Public Power Association. He is Mike Hyland, not Mark Hyland.

A corrected version of the story is below:

KAIBETO - Ariz - AP - Miranda - Haskie

KAIBETO, Ariz. (AP) — Miranda Haskie sits amid the glow of candles at her kitchen table as the sun sinks into a deep blue horizon silhouetting juniper trees and a nearby mesa.

Her husband, Jimmie Long, Jr., fishes for the wick to light a kerosene lamp as the couple and their 13-year-old son prepare to spend a final night without electricity.

Morning - Utility - Workers - Poles - House

They're waiting for morning, when utility workers who recently installed four electric poles outside their double-wide house trailer will connect it to the power grid, meaning they will no longer be among the tens of thousands of people without power on the Navajo Nation, the country's largest American Indian reservation.

Haskie and Long are getting their electricity this month thanks to a project to connect 300 homes with the help of volunteer utility crews from across the U.S.

Navajo - Tribal - Utility - Authority - Homes

The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority typically connects from 400 to 450 homes a year, chipping away at the 15,000 scattered, rural homes without power on the 27,000-square-mile (43,000-square-kilometer) reservation that lies in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah.

At that rate, it will take the tribal utility about 35 more years to get electricity to the 60,000 of the reservation's 180,000 residents who don't have it.

Couple - Home - End - Dirt - Roads

The couple's home at the end of rutted dirt roads outside the small town of Kaibeto was about a quarter-mile (0.4 kilometers) from the closest power line. Life disconnected from the grid in the high desert town dotted with canyons and mesas was simple and joyful but also inconvenient, they said.

"It's not that bad. Growing up, you get used to...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ABC News
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