Wristband samplers show similar chemical exposure across three continents

phys.org | 2/14/2019 | Staff
MonkeyBubble (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2019/wristbandsam.jpg

To assess differences and trends in personal chemical exposure, Oregon State University researchers deployed chemical-sampling wristbands to individuals on three continents.

After they analyzed the wristbands that were returned, they found that no two wristbands had identical chemical detections. But the same 14 chemicals were detected in more than 50 percent of the wristbands returned from the United States, Africa and South America.

Farmworker - Senegal - Preschooler - Oregon - Chemicals

"Whether you are a farmworker in Senegal or a preschooler in Oregon, you might be exposed to those same 14 chemicals that we detected in over 50 percent of the wristbands," said Holly Dixon, a doctoral candidate at Oregon State and the study's lead author.

The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is published in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

Study - Wristbands - Chemicals - Air - Skin

This study demonstrates that the wristbands, which absorb chemicals from the air and skin, are an excellent screening tool for population exposures to organic chemicals, said Kim Anderson, an OSU environmental chemist and leader of the research team. It's notable, she said, that most of the 14 common chemicals aren't heavily studied.

"Some of these are not on our radar, yet they represent an enormous exposure," she said. "If we want to understand the impact of chemical exposures, this was very enlightening."

Anderson - Team - Wristband - Years - Studies

Anderson and her team invented the wristband samplers several years ago. They have been used in other studies, including one that measured Houston residents' exposure in floodwaters after Hurricane Harvey.

In this study, 242 volunteers from 14 communities in four countries—the United States, Senegal, South Africa and Peru—wore a total of 262 wristbands. The Houston residents were included in the study.

Oregon - State - Researchers - Wristbands - Chemicals

Oregon State researchers analyzed the wristbands for 1,530 unique organic chemicals. The number of chemical detections ranged from four to 43 per wristband, with 191 different chemicals detected. And 1,339 chemicals weren't detected in any wristband. They detected 36...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!