Gender gap in spatial reasoning starts in elementary school, meta-analysis finds

ScienceDaily | 4/11/2019 | Staff
Frost123 (Posted by) Level 3
The Psychological Bulletin, a journal of the American Psychological Association, is publishing the findings.

"Some researchers have argued that there is an intrinsic gender difference in spatial reasoning -- that boys are naturally better at it than girls," says lead author Jillian Lauer, who is set to graduate from Emory in May with a PhD in psychology. "While our results don't exclude any possibility that biological influences contribute to the gender gap, they suggest that other factors may be more important in driving the gender difference in spatial skills during childhood."

Co-authors - Paper - Stella - Lourenco - Associate

Co-authors of the paper include Stella Lourenco, associate professor of psychology at Emory, whose lab specializes in the development of spatial and numerical cognition. Co-author Eukyung Yhang worked on the paper as an Emory undergraduate, funded by the university's Institute for Quantitative Theory and Methods. Yhang graduated in 2018 and is now at Yale University School of Medicine.

The meta-analysis included 128 studies of gender differences in spatial reasoning, combining statistics on more than 30,000 children and adolescents aged three to 18 years. The authors found no gender difference in mental-rotation skills among preschoolers, but a small male advantage emerged in children between the ages of six and eight.

Differences - Abilities - Men - Women - Men

While differences in verbal and mathematical abilities between men and women tend to be small or non-existent, twice as many men as women are top performers in mental rotation, making it one of the largest gender differences in cognition.

Mental rotation is considered one of the hallmarks of spatial reasoning. "If you're packing your suitcase and trying to figure out how each item can fit within that space, or you're building furniture based on a diagram, you're likely engaged in mental rotation, imagining how different objects can rotate to fit together," Lauer explains.

Prior - Research - Skills - Success

Prior research has also shown that superior spatial skills predict success in male-dominated...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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