Children in South Asia hardest hit by air pollution, says study

phys.org | 3/29/2019 | Staff
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Air pollution will shorten the life expectancy of children born today by an average of 20 months and will have the greatest impact in south Asia, according to a study published Wednesday.

The State of Global Air report, published by the US-based Health Effects Institute and the University of British Columbia, says air pollution is the fifth leading cause of early death worldwide—responsible for more deaths than malaria, road accidents, malnutrition or alcohol.

Loss - Life - Expectancy - Children - South

However it warns "the loss of life expectancy is not borne equally", with children in South Asia set to have their lives cut short by 30 months because of a combination of outdoor air pollution and dirty indoor air.

In East Asia the study says air pollution will shorten children's lives by an estimated 23 months—compared with around 20 weeks for children in developed parts of Asia Pacific and North America.

Report - Data - End - Air - Pollution

The report, which uses data up to the end of 2017, estimates that if air pollution levels were brought within World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines Bangladesh life expectancy would see the highest expected gain, at nearly 1.3 years.

India, Nigeria, and Pakistan would all see average life expectancy increase by around one year.

State - Reforms - Pollution - Levels

Despite state reforms to reduce pollution levels,...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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