Firefox, Chrome try banishing spammy website requests you probably hate

CNET | 4/1/2019 | Stephen Shankland
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Mozilla's Nightly version of Firefox began a two-week experiment Monday that blocks all notification requests unless the browser user has clicked or typed something into the site.

Chances are that when a website pop-up asks your permission to send you notifications, you don't want to grant it. That's a problem Firefox and Chrome engineers have begun trying to fix.

Notifications - Example - Calendar - Meeting - Message

Website notifications can be useful, for example, when you want your web-based calendar to alert you to an upcoming meeting or when an important message arrives on your web-based chat. But a monthlong Mozilla test found people using the beta version of its Firefox browser denied that request 97 percent of the time.

That's why Mozilla and Google are exploring ways to block notification permission requests until some kind of action on the website offers a better indication that we're likely to be receptive rather than ticked off.

Mozilla - Nightly - Version - Firefox - Experiment

Mozilla's Nightly version of Firefox began a two-week experiment Monday that blocks all notification requests unless the browser user has clicked or typed something into the website, Firefox engineer Johann Hofmann said in a blog post. And Google is "looking into many strategies to tamp down on this," including monitoring our engagement with websites before permitting the request, Chrome standards guru Alex Russell tweeted Sunday.

The moves reflect the difficulties of adapting the web from its initial design as a repository of static documents into a foundation for apps. A dynamic web is great for things like messaging and social networks, but the interactivity means it's harder for websites to strike the right balance between powerful and pushy. That's especially true given the famously aggressive ethos popular in Silicon Valley that it's easier to ask forgiveness than permission.

Websites - Permission - Notifications - Time - Requests

It's common for websites to ask you for permission to show notifications, but most of the time those requests aren't...
(Excerpt) Read more at: CNET
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