Nappuccinos To Weekend Z's: Strategize To Catch Up On Lost Sleep

NPR.org | 3/24/2019 | Staff
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A 20-minute nap refreshes. Just don't sleep in so long on Sunday morning that you find it hard to fall asleep Sunday night.

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Lots - Reasons - Hours - Night - Travel

There are lots of reasons why many of us don't get the recommended seven hours or more of sleep each night. Travel schedules, work deadlines, TV bingeing and — a big one — having young children all take a toll.

Research published recently in the journal Sleep finds that up to six years after the birth of a child, many mothers and fathers still don't sleep as much as they did before their child was born. For parents, there's just less time in the day to devote to yourself.

Scientist - Warns - Against - Walking - Life

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

So, can you catch up on sleep? That partly depends on how much sleep you've missed.

Study - Issue - Current - Biology - Points

A study in the current issue of Current Biology points to just how quickly the adverse effects of sleep deprivation can kick in. Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder recruited a bunch of young, healthy adults who agreed to a stay in a sleep lab. Some were allowed to sleep no more than five hours per night for five consecutive days.

"After five days, people [gained] as much as 5 pounds," says study author Christopher Depner, who studies the links between sleep loss and metabolic diseases. Lack of sleep can throw off the hormones that regulate appetite, he explains, so people tend to eat more.

Depner - Colleagues - Decrease - Sensitivity

Depner and his colleagues also documented a decrease in insulin sensitivity among the sleep-deprived...
(Excerpt) Read more at: NPR.org
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