In this nematode species males are needed for reproduction but not their genes

ScienceDaily | 3/14/2019 | Staff
ridge-khridge-kh (Posted by) Level 4
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Seventy years later, this worm has once again drawn interest, this time from an international team led by researchers from the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, and the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle1. They confirmed Victor Nigon's initial observations, but also noted that in 9% of cases the embryo produced a male when the sperm genetic material was used after fertilization. Males can subsequently transmit their genes only to their sons, making M. belari a unique case in which males make no genetic contribution, and can instead be seen as a simple extension of females by helping them initiate the development of their eggs.

If males do not transmit the genes of their mothers, then at least they must help their mothers produce as many descendants as possible. This is possible only if the sons produced by a female help her daughters produce a large number of embryos....
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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