3D PRINTING INDUSTRY RESPONDS TO PROPOSED EXTENSION OF BIS U.S. EXPORT CONTROLS

3D Printing Industry | 3/12/2019 | Tia Vialva
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Click For Photo: https://3dprintingindustry.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/720px-US-DOC-BureauOfIndustryAndSecurity-Seal.svg_.png

In 2018, the U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) announced that it was seeking to extend its export controls across a class of deemed “emerging technologies.”

Encompassing 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and other technology including AI, robotics and machine learning, the extended control will not only have ramifications for U.S. relationships with other nations, particularly China, but there are concerns that it would deeply affect the development of these technologies across the nation, impacting the millions of dollars invested in their R&D each year.

Changes - BIS - Comment - Industry - Deadline

Before implementing these changes to export however, the BIS requested comment from industry. Now the deadline has passed, the bureau has received over 200 documents outlining stakeholder views on the changes, the majority of which appear to express fundamental concern about the proposal, and those seeking a much clearer definition of the supposed “emerging technologies.”

3D Printing Industry reviewed the submissions, and we observe strong statements opposing the proposal from the likes of Airbus, Boeing, Stratasys and Carbon.

View - Stratasys - Fortus - Carbon - Fiber

A view of the Stratasys Fortus 380mc Carbon Fiber edition. Photo via SYS.

As leading proponents of 3D printing and additive manufacturing, both with a substantial presence in the U.S., it is unsurprising that Airbus and Boeing have each detailed their concerns, suggestions and the potential impact the proposed change would have on their businesses. Both are active within the defense sector, and well positioned to comment on the BIS’ assertion that emerging technologies present a threat to national security, although it is also worth considering bias.

Printing - Arthur - Shulman - Director - Global

Specifically relating to 3D printing, Arthur Shulman, Director of Global Trade Controls at Boeing, writes, “Designing for additive manufacturing can provide greater performance. The technology is widely used and shared, as evidenced by worldwide conferences on this topic.”

“THE TECHNOLOGY ITSELF DOES NOT PRESENT NATIONAL SECURITY CONCERNS.”

AM - Parts

“While AM could be used to produce militarily critical parts, the...
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