High-speed 3-D printer for high-performance plastics

phys.org | 3/1/2019 | Staff
newusr01 (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2019/highspeed3dp.jpg

The additive manufacture of large-volume plastic components is a time-consuming undertaking. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU have now developed **** Extrusion Additive Manufacturing (SEAM), a system and process that is eight times faster than conventional 3-D printing. Visitors will be able to see the ultrafast 3-D printer in action at the Fraunhofer Booth C22 in Hall 2 during the Hannover Messe from April 1 through 5, 2019.

Three-dimensional printers that build small souvenirs layer by layer from melted plastic are often used at tradeshows. It can take up to an hour to produce a pocket-sized souvenir. This process is far too slow for the mass-production of components, as required by the automotive industry, for instance. A system from the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU in Chemnitz is now taking 3-D printing to a new level: The system's high-speed technology takes only 18 minutes to produce a plastic component that is 30 centimeters high. A team of researchers at the Fraunhofer IWU has developed this technology for the additive manufacture of large-volume resilient plastic components. Tool manufacturers as well as the automotive and aerospace industries benefit from the innovative 3-D printer that achieves eight times the process speed. This printer uses the SEAM – short for **** Extrusion Additive Manufacturing – process developed at the Chemnitz Institute.

SEAM - Process - Speeds - Machine - Tool

How does SEAM achieve these high process speeds? "By combining machine tool technology with 3-D printing," says Dr. Martin Kausch, a scientist at Fraunhofer IWU. To process the plastic, the researchers use a specially designed unit that melts the raw material and ejects it at a high output rate. This unit is installed above a construction platform that can be swiveled in...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Aim and timing is evereything.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!