Sophisticated 3-D measurement technology permits gesture-based human-machine interaction in real time

phys.org | 3/1/2019 | Staff
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Humans and machines will increasingly support each other in the workplace. For processes to be efficient, the machine must respond to the human worker without any time delay. Thanks to sophisticated high-speed 3-D measurement and sensor technology, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF are making this real-time interaction possible. They will be demonstrating how this works in practice at the Hannover Messe trade show from April 1 to 5, 2019 using the example of an interactive wall of spheres that reacts immediately, contact-free and in three dimensions to every movement of a person standing in front of it (Hall 2, Booth C22).

As gesture control represents a seamless interface between humans and machines, more and more machines, robots and devices are able to respond to gestural cues. Researchers at Fraunhofer IOF in Jena are raising human-machine interaction to a new level: the high-speed 3-D measurement and sensor technology developed in the 3-D-LivingLab research project (see "3-D-LivingLab" box) enables them to capture and interprete even complex movements – and does so in real time. At Hannover Messe 2019, the research team is demonstrating its gesture-based human-machine interaction technology using the example of a wall made up of 150 spheres, which copies in 3-D every head, arm and hand movement of a person standing in front of it. The wall of spheres effectively imitates the body movements with contact-free 3-D reactions in real time, free from irritating time lags. The wall of spheres was created as part of the "3-D-LivingLab" project.

System - Modules - Sensor - Data - Processing

The system is made up of several modules: 3-D sensor, 3-D data processing and image...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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