TU GRAZ BUILDING THE FOUNDATION FOR 3D PRINTED HOUSES

3D Printing Industry | 2/28/2019 | Beau Jackson
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Click For Photo: https://3dprintingindustry.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/The-successful-printing-of-the-first-layers-of-concrete-for-the-prototypes.-Photo-via-TU-Graz.-1024x512.jpg


Click For Photo: https://3dprintingindustry.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/The-successful-printing-of-the-first-layers-of-concrete-for-the-prototypes.-Photo-via-TU-Graz..jpg

Graz University of Technology (TU Graz) in Austria is working on a project investigating the development of 3D printed concrete parts for construction.

The Additive Fabrication of CONCRETE ELEMENTS BY ROBOTS (COEBRO) project is investigating the resource efficiency of using concrete with 3D printing. The aim of the project is to eventually implement technology into buildings.

Hand - Conviction - Leap - Technology - Construction

“What drives us, on the one hand, is a conviction that a leap in technology in the construction industry is possible,” explains Stefan Peters, head of the Institute of Structural Design.

“ON THE OTHER HAND, WE THINK THAT THIS TECHNOLOGY CAN BE USED TO BUILD MORE EFFICIENTLY AND IN A MORE RESOURCE SAVING WAY.”

COEBRO - Project - Collaboration - Team - Architects

Founded in 2015, the COEBRO project features the collaboration of an interdisciplinary team of architects, engineers and material technologists. Members of TU Graz’s Institute of Structural Design have been working on the project alongside scientific and industry partners of TU Graz.

The project is funded by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), a national funding agency for industrial research and development. More specifically, support for the COEBRO project is facilitated through FFG’s Bridge programme, a funding network that aims to carry out collaborative research with institutions and companies from the industrial and scientific sectors.

Print - Head - Arm - Image - TU

The 3D print head mounted on the robotic arm. Image via TU Graz.

Using 3D printing, the COEBRO team is seeking to advance the production of prefabricated concrete parts from the current standard manufacturing process, which is casting technology. This method uses formwork to mold concrete into a desired shape. Through fabrication of a mold, this technique relies on raw fossil materials like coal and oil. It is also economically inefficient, as geometrically demanding formwork is expensive, thus limiting design freedom.

COEBRO - Team - Construction - Parts - Concrete

The COEBRO team thought about how they could manufacture construction parts with less concrete and resources, while maintaining the same robust qualities...
(Excerpt) Read more at: 3D Printing Industry
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