‘Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse’ Colored Outside the Lines

Variety | 5/22/2020 | Thomas J. McLean
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The well-worn superhero genre and one of its best-known icons are unlikely vehicles for creating a visually fresh animated feature. But Sony Pictures Animation’s work on the Oscar-nominated animated feature “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” shows throwing out the rule book and letting everyone play in the creative sandbox can pay off big.

“I think we all had one boss, and that boss is the movie,” says head of character animation Josh Beveridge, who oversaw just over 180 animators working mostly out of Sony Pictures Imageworks’ Vancouver facility.

Screen - Style - Book - Art - Illustration

Seeking to replicate on screen the graphic style of comic book art and illustration using everything from ink lines and half-tone dots to multi-panel images, Beveridge says the movie was animated almost entirely “on twos.” That typically refers to holding a single image for two frames instead of one so only 12 are required to produce one second of film, but it meant many things on this film.

“We used it just as another tool to communicate style,” says Beveridge. “It also gives this whole new texture to things; it’s a little more crisp, you see the poses more and it just feels more like a comic book.”

Animators - Technique - Ways - Look - Movie

Animators could use as much or as little of the technique as they wanted, and in as many ways as the graphic look of the movie required. Sometimes a character’s face was animated on ones and the rest of them on twos, says Beveridge.

This posed a number of technical challenges, especially with elements typically created with simulations, like physics, cloth and hair,...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Variety
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