Children had milk teeth 100,000 years ago, just like they do today

Mail Online | 1/17/2019 | Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline
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An ancient child of a long-extinct human-like species from 104,000 years ago in northern China had teeth that grew in a similar way to modern-day humans.

Remains of the ancient six-year-old child, known as the Xujiayao juvenile, were first found in the 1970s and reanalysed.

Evidence - Development - Children - Today

Evidence found the dental development was very similar to what is seen in young children today.

Both the archaic hominid and modern Homo sapiens have a prolonged period of infantile dependency on others to survive.

Debbie - Guatelli-Steinberg - Co-author - Study - Professor

Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg, co-author of the study and professor of anthropology at The Ohio State University, said: 'The Xujiayao juvenile is the oldest fossil found in east Asia that has dental development comparable to modern humans,' Guatelli-Steinberg said.

'It may suggest that these archaic humans had a slow life history like modern humans, with a prolonged period of childhood dependency.'

Growth - Lines - Teeth - Record - Development

Growth lines in the teeth were well preserved and these provide a record of dental development.

Modern humans take far longer to develop their adult teeth than our primate relatives and it is believed this is due to a longer period of child dependency.

Researchers

Researchers...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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